Healing Wounds and Diabetic ulcers

All mammalian tissues depend for their survival and health on an adequate oxygen uptake and therefore ozone would benefit every person through optimizing tissue oxygenation. Thus ozone has a preventative as well as a remedial role. The applications for prevention would include increasing longevity, enhancing performance, rejuvenating seniors, optimizing the healing of wounds and stimulating immunity.

Dr. Aubourg and Dr. Lacoste were French physicians using ozone insufflation 1934-1938. Aubourg wrote “Medical Ozone: Production, Dosage and Methods of Clinical Application” in 1938. He gave ozone rectally, vaginally, injected into wounds and by breathing. In 8000 applications, there were no harmful side effects.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23249441

BMC Infect Dis. 2012 Dec 18;12:358. doi: 10.1186/1471-2334-12-358.

Effect of low-dose gaseous ozone on pathogenic bacteria.

Fontes BCattani Heimbecker AMde Souza Brito GCosta SFvan der Heijden IMLevin ASRasslan S.

Source

3rd Division of Clinical Surgery and Laboratory of Medical Investigation (LIM-62), Hospital das Clínicas, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Treatment of chronically infected wounds is a challenge, and bacterial environmental contamination is a growing issue in infection control. Ozone may have a role in these situations. The objective of this study was to determine whether a low dose of gaseous ozone/oxygen mixture eliminates pathogenic bacteria cultivated in Petri dishes.

METHODS:

A pilot study with 6 bacterial strains was made using different concentrations of ozone in an ozone-oxygen mixture to determine a minimally effective dose that completely eliminated bacterial growth. The small and apparently bactericidal gaseous dose of 20 μg/mL ozone/oxygen (1:99) mixture, applied for 5 min under atmospheric pressure was selected. In the 2nd phase, eight bacterial strains with well characterized resistance patterns were evaluated in vitro using agar-blood in adapted Petri dishes (105 bacteria/dish). The cultures were divided into 3 groups: 1–ozone-oxygen gaseous mixture containing 20 μg of O(3)/mL for 5 min; 2–100% oxygen for 5 min; 3–baseline: no gas was used.

RESULTS:

The selected ozone dose was applied to the following eight strains: Escherichia coli, oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, oxacillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter baumannii susceptible only to carbapenems, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa susceptible to imipenem and meropenem. All isolates were completely inhibited by the ozone-oxygen mixture while growth occurred in the other 2 groups.

CONCLUSION:

A single topical application by nebulization of a low ozone dose completely inhibited the growth of all potentially pathogenic bacterial strains with known resistance to antimicrobial agents.